Heidi Schwartz, Author at Facility Executive - Creating Intelligent Buildings | Page 380 of 401

CARE established an ambitious schedule to divert 40% of carpet landfill waste by the year 2012 by focusing upon post-consumer carpet waste, helping to identify, promote, and develop carpet reclamation and recycling programs.


CARE established an ambitious schedule to divert 40% of carpet landfill waste by the year 2012 by focusing upon post-consumer carpet waste, helping to identify, promote, and develop carpet reclamation and recycling programs.

CARE and Tricycle Team Up To Reduce Carpet to Landfills

Heidi Schwartz


Used equipment now on eBay

Used equipment now on eBay

This service hopes to offer a steady stream of quality used equipment – from skid steer loaders, mini-excavators and aerial lifts, to generators, welders, and more.



ARI and ASHRAE to develop mutual HVAC standards

ARI and ASHRAE to develop mutual HVAC standards

The Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute (ARI) and the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE) have approved a new cooperative agreement for standards development that reinforces their long-running alliance. For TFM‘s past coverage of this issue, read “Sick Buildings: Common Causes and Sensible Solutions” by Jeffrey Entin. Preserved and formalized in the agreement is one of the tenets of the ASHRAE-ARI relationship – that ASHRAE develops method of testing standards that describe how to perform product testing, while ARI develops rating standards that specify rating conditions and details on how to rate performance of product using those tests. The agreement makes clear that where there is a published ARI rating standard, the ARI rating standard is the appropriate place for inclusion of the product performance rating conditions. Likewise, where there is a published ASHRAE method of testing standard, the ASHRAE standard is the appropriate place for inclusion of the method of testing details. Further, to address both future and all existing standards, the agreement stipulates the mechanism for moving the method of testing standards from ARI to ASHRAE and for moving rating conditions from ASHRAE to ARI standards. “This agreement clarifies, for ASHRAE and ARI members, the respective roles of each organization in standards development,” says Mark Menzer, ARI’s vice president of engineering and research. “Each organization will recognize the other’s area of competence, communicate to establish whether the other wishes to participate, and cooperate so as to avoid conflict or overlap between standards.” “This agreement is part of ASHRAE’s continuing efforts to improve our standards development process and our relationship with ARI,” says Lee Burgett, P.E., ASHRAE president. “The agreement allows ARI and ASHRAE to determine responsibilities for—and streamline development of—standards to draw upon the expertise of our members.” Currently, nearly 50 ARI rating standards reference and require the use of corresponding ASHRAE method of testing standards with a number of others currently under development at ASHRAE and ARI.


The best and the worst

The best and the worst

According to a new survey, Camden, NJ is the most dangerous city in the country, followed by Detroit, St. Louis, Flint, Richmond, and Baltimore. This is Camden’s second year at the top. The safest city in the country is Newton, MA, followed by Clarkstown, NY, Amherst, NY, Mission Viejo, CA, and Brick Township, NJ.


Safety for an aging workforce

Safety for an aging workforce

As those born between 1946 and 1964, the large ‘baby boomer’ generation, ages so to does our workforce while the labor pool shrinks. Currently, workplace injury rates for older workers are the lowest of any age group, but their fatality rate is the highest. To accommodate the aging workforce and to work to reduce fatality rates, businesses should design a safe workplace for this aging, but valuable, workforce, American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE) notes, or be faced with a negative economic impact. “Businesses must act now to accommodate and provide a safer work environment for the aging worker, a valuable and experienced group, or their bottom line will be impacted negatively” ASSE President Jack H. Dobson, Jr., CSP, says. “There are easy and economical ways to do this that in the long run will save time, increase output and contribute positively to the business.”For TFM‘s coverage of this issue, see “A Recipe for Safety” by Paula Penning. The U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) workplace statistics for 2004 show that those 64 and older had the lowest number of workplace injuries, but the fatality rate for those 55 and older rose by 10%. In 2003, workers 65 and older “continued to record the highest fatality rate of any other age group, more than three times the rate of fatalities for those aged 25-34,” according to the DOL. Most of these fatalities were transportation-related, from falls, from being struck by an object and from homicides. As baby boomers begin to retire over the next few years, the DOL notes the workforce will shrink as those born from 1965 to 1985, a time with a declining birthrate, enter the workforce. According to American Demographics, currently there are 76.9 million baby boomers in the U.S. The majority of boomers live in California, Florida, Illinois, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Texas. “As the percentage of the workforce aged 55 and over increases, injury rates for the whole work population decreases while productivity increases,” ASSE member Dr. Joel M. Haight, P.E., CSP, researcher and faculty member at Penn State University, says. “An estimated 3.9 million occupational injuries and illnesses were treated in hospital emergency departments among all industry and occupation groups for workers aged 15 and older. The highest numbers of these injuries and illnesses occurred among workers aged 25-44.” “Data suggests there is no age-related safety performance issue between the 25-54 year age group and that of the over 55 years age group, according to 2001-02 statistics,” ASSE member and Colorado… …Read More…


Massive layoffs at GM

Massive layoffs at GM

Plant closures will hit Doraville, GA, Oklahoma City, and Lansing, MI. This is in addition to closures that took place earlier this year in Linden, NJ, Baltimore, and at another plant in Lansing. For the full report from Reuters, click here.


Answers to last Friday’s OSHA violation quiz

Answers to last Friday’s OSHA violation quiz

ANSWERS: The violations are given along with the regulation numbers that address them. Workplace is a mess: 1910.22(a)(1) Rats: 1910.141(a)(5) LP forklift used in EE rated area (see sign): 1910.178(c)(2)(iv) Propane tank lying on the floor: 1910.178(f)(2), 1910.110(f)(2)(i), 1910.110(f)(2)(ii)Worker standing on the forks: 1910.178(m)(3) Operator has dismounted the forklift without lowering the forks: 1910.178(m)(5)(iii) Exit blocked: 1910.178(m)(14), 1910.37(a)(3)Loose objects in the aisle: 1910.178(n)(14) Transmission oil leak: 1910.178(p)(3), 1910.22(a)(2)Propane leak: 1910.178(p)(4) Headlight hanging down: 1910.178(h)(2), 1910.178(q)(1)Extension cord on the floor: 1910.305(g)(1)(iii)(A), 1910.305(g)(2)(ii) If you scored poorly on this quiz, you may want to revisit your knowledge of OSHA guidelines. MANCOMM and its partner company, American Safety Training, Inc., work together to develop and provide OSHA compliance safety products and training for both general industry and the construction industry. MANCOMM has produced a Forklift Video Training System and also publishes OSHA and Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations. For TFM’s OSHA coverage, see “OSHA Compliance Made Easier” by John P. Kelly of BOMA International.


Answers to last Friday’s OSHA violation quiz

Answers to last Friday’s OSHA violation quiz

ANSWERS: The violations are given along with the regulation numbers that address them. Workplace is a mess: 1910.22(a)(1) Rats: 1910.141(a)(5) LP forklift used in EE rated area (see sign): 1910.178(c)(2)(iv) Propane tank lying on the floor: 1910.178(f)(2), 1910.110(f)(2)(i), 1910.110(f)(2)(ii)Worker standing on the forks: 1910.178(m)(3) Operator has dismounted the forklift without lowering the forks: 1910.178(m)(5)(iii) Exit blocked: 1910.178(m)(14), 1910.37(a)(3)Loose objects in the aisle: 1910.178(n)(14) Transmission oil leak: 1910.178(p)(3), 1910.22(a)(2)Propane leak: 1910.178(p)(4) Headlight hanging down: 1910.178(h)(2), 1910.178(q)(1)Extension cord on the floor: 1910.305(g)(1)(iii)(A), 1910.305(g)(2)(ii) If you scored poorly on this quiz, you may want to revisit your knowledge of OSHA guidelines. MANCOMM and its partner company, American Safety Training, Inc., work together to develop and provide OSHA compliance safety products and training for both general industry and the construction industry. MANCOMM has produced a Forklift Video Training System and also publishes OSHA and Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations. For TFM’s OSHA coverage, see “OSHA Compliance Made Easier” by John P. Kelly of BOMA International.


Look out education FMs: MIT presents the $100 laptop

Look out education FMs: MIT presents the $100 laptop

U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan unveiled the first working prototype of the $100 laptop Nov. 16 at the World Summit on the Information Society in Tunis, Tunisia. Annan was joined by Nicholas Negroponte, chairman and co-founder of the Media Lab at MIT, in presenting the laptop to the gathering. The $100 laptop, first announced by Negroponte at the World Economic Forum in January 2005, is an ultra-low-cost, full-featured computer designed to enhance children’s primary and secondary education worldwide. It is a joint project of the Media Lab and the nonprofit One Laptop per Child (OLPC) association, which aims to equip the world’s school children and their teachers with a personal, portable, connected computer. “The $100 laptop is inspiring in many respects,” says Annan. “It is an impressive technical achievement, able to do almost everything that larger, more expensive computers can do. It holds the promise of major advances in economic and social development. But perhaps most important is the true meaning of ‘one laptop per child.’ This is not just a matter of giving a laptop to each child, as if bestowing on them some magical charm. The magic lies within — within each child, within each scientist-, scholar-, or just plain citizen-in-the-making. This initiative is meant to bring it forth into the light of day.” “Children are the greatest natural resource of any country, and educating these children is at the root of solving our largest and most complex problems,” says Negroponte. “Yet the best education may not come from sitting in a traditional classroom, but rather through independent interaction and exploration. The development of a $100 laptop will now make this possible for all kids — especially those in developing nations. It will redefine how we ‘learn learning.’” OLPC is a Delaware-based, nonprofit organization created by faculty members from the MIT Media Lab to design, manufacture, and distribute laptops that are sufficiently inexpensive to provide every child in the world access to knowledge and modern forms of education. The laptops will be sold to governments and issued to children by schools on a basis of one laptop per child. These machines will be rugged, Linux-based, and so energy-efficient that hand-cranking alone will generate sufficient power for operation. Mesh networking will give many machines Internet access from one connection. The pricing goal is to start at approximately $100 and then steadily decrease. The World Summit on the Information Society is the culmination of three years of planning, turning the global spotlight to developing strategies to bridge the digital divide and… …Read More…