Tag: Friday Funny

FRIDAY FUNNY: October 23 is Punch Your Co-Worker Day!!

Study the rules, break out your list of folks who you want to punch the living day lights out of, and get to it.....and have a great day!

FacilityBlog Welcomes 1 Millionth Visitor!

Almost seven years to the day FacilityBlog was introduced by Today's Facility Manager, it welcomed its 1 millionth visitor on Saturday, May 12, 2012. Started in May 2005, FacilityBlog is where people discuss the demands faced by facility management professionals. Visitors are encouraged to comment; they can also link directly to anything of interest they find here. With daily updates and regular features such as Friday Funny, Question of the Week, and new product and service announcements, FacilityBlog is the most widely read Blog about facility management. The FacilityBlog currently hosts 2,982 posts and 1,047 comments on a wide variety of facility management topics.

Friday Funny: It’s a Bird! It’s a Plane! It’s a…SHARK???

This week's Friday Funny is another one from the "you have to see it to believe it" file. The world of weird architecture is officially just a little bit weirder. Yes folks, there is a house in Oxford, England, with the back half of a shark protruding through its roof. Here's the explanation (complete story found at this link)...
This ordinary home became the centre of world attention, and the headless shark still excites interest today. Bill Heine commissioned the shark and still owns the house. An American who studied law at Balliol College, he was running two Oxford cinemas at the time, but since 1988 he has been better known as a Radio Oxford presenter. When pressed by journalists to provide a rationale for the shark, he suggested the following: 'The shark was to express someone feeling totally impotent and ripping a hole in their roof out of a sense of impotence and anger and desperation.... It is saying something about CND, nuclear power, Chernobyl and Nagasaki.' The headless sculpture, with the label "Untitled 1986" fixed to the gate to the house, was erected on the 41st anniversary of the dropping of the atomic bomb on Nagasaki. Created by the sculptor John Buckley, it is made of fibreglass, weighs four hundredweight, and is 25 feet long.
Now this is where it gets interesting (and you thought you had strange zoning requests)...
Oxford City Council tried to get rid of the shark on the grounds that it was dangerous to the public, but engineers inspected the roof girders that had been specially installed to support it and pronounced the erection safe. The council then decided that the shark was development within the definition contained in Section 22 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1971, and that as such it had to be removed. Their offer to display it in a public building such as a swimming pool was not, however, accepted by Bill. Bill played for time, but in 1990 he was refused retrospective planning permission by Oxford City Council. Undeterred, in 1991 he appealed to the Secretary of State for the Environment (then Michael Heseltine); and in 1992 Heseltine's Inspector Peter Macdonald came out in favour of the applicant, and had the following to say about the shark: 'It is not in dispute that this is a large and prominent feature. That was the intention, but the intention of the appellant and the artist is not an issue as far as planning permission is concerned. The case should be decided on its planning merits, not by resorting to 'utilitarianism', in the sense of the greatest good to the greatest number. And it is necessary to consider the relationship between the shark and its setting .... In this case it is not in dispute that the shark is not in harmony with its surroundings, but then it is not intended to be in harmony with them. The basic facts are there for almost all to see. Into this archetypal urban setting crashes (almost literally) the shark. The contrast is deliberate ... and, in this sense, the work is quite specific to its setting. As a 'work of art' the sculpture ('Untitled 1986') would be 'read' quite differently in, say, an art gallery or on another site. An incongruous object can become accepted as a landmark after a time, becoming well known, even well loved in the process. Something of this sort seems to have happened, for many people, to the so-called 'Oxford shark'. The Council is understandably concerned about precedent here. The first concern is simple: proliferation with sharks (and Heaven knows what else) crashing through roofs all over the City. This fear is exaggerated. In the five years since the shark was erected, no other examples have occurred. Only very recently has there been a proposal for twin baby sharks in the Iffley Road. But any system of control must make some small place for the dynamic, the unexpected, the downright quirky. I therefore recommend that the Headington shark be allowed to remain.' And so it has survived. No one living in Headington notices it much any more, but it caused a tremendous stir both locally and nationally on the day it appeared. It had been winched up by a crane overnight, and although the police were aware of what was going on they were powerless to do anything, as there is no law to prevent a man from putting a shark on his own roof.

Bonus Friday Funny: The Saddest Offices in the World Contest Winners (or Losers)

This week's bonus FF post comes courtesy of Wired magazine, which runs an annual Saddest-Cubicle contest. And since Wired caters to the IT audience, nearly all of the finalists were submitted by poor souls from that profession.
Pictured here is the winner, submitted by David Gunnells (who also supplied the photo). Julie Sloane of Wired, writes,
David Gunnells is an IT guy at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. His desk is penned in by heavily used filing cabinets in a windowless conference room, near a poorly ventilated bathroom and a microwave. The overhead light doesn't work -- his mother-in-law was so saddened by his cube that she gave him a lamp -- and the other side of the wall is a parking garage. Gunnells recalls a day when one co-worker reheated catfish in the microwave, while another used the bathroom and covered the smell with a stinky air freshener.
For the other 10 finalists, click this link. Personally, I think the IT contractor inside a 40-foot steel cargo container is worse than this. Have you put anyone in a work station worthy of this (dis)honor? After seeing these entries, I have come to the following conclusion: some facility professionals should be ashamed (particularly those at the facilities featured in this segment). The sad thing is, I'm sure we've all "worked" in a similarly dismal setup at one point in time. I know I have.

Friday Funny: First Industrial Safety Rap Song Created

Employees mix industrial safety and rap music.

FRIDAY FUNNY: Isn't It Ironic?

What happens when Chicken Little comes home to roost in a municipal building? Ask members of the San Antonio Dangerous Structure Determination Board, and they will indeed say the sky is falling....and it's not pretty.

FRIDAY FUNNY: Fill 'Er Up (no spillage, please)

In honor of the Super Bowl, this Friday Funny article salutes an innovation that may literally shake up the way stadiums, restaurants, and other high volume brew purveyors serve their customers forever...but without the foam!

FRIDAY FUNNY: No Laughing Matter for Fountain Lady

So what do you do, facility managers? Can you train your staff to respond to situations like this so they react "professionally" rather than instinctively? Is it possible to stifle the natural inclination to laugh when you see something like this unfold in front of your eyes?

FRIDAY FUNNY: Tech Support Meets Who's On First

While this has been knocking around for some time, it's still quite funny. Imagine if Bud Abbott and Lou Costello were alive today. Their infamous sketch, 'Who's on First?' might have turned out something like this.

FRIDAY FUNNY: Why Be Normal? Be Xtranormal!

The next time you want to make some sort of company wide announcement about a new facility management policy that may be slightly unpopular, you may consider the power of the pastel kitty and the strategic head tilt!

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