utility-incentives | Facility Executive - Creating Intelligent Buildings

Confronted by a failing domestic water booster pump at one of the downtown commercial properties managed by Martin Selig Real Estate, chief engineer Phil Boyd began searching for options to repair the existing tri-plex boosting pump system. The booster station serves the 43-story commercial office building at 1000 2nd Ave., located blocks from the Puget Sound waterway. Such high-rise buildings—including hotels, multifamily, office and other institutional applications—require pressure boosting equipment to raise incoming municipal water pressure to serve upper floors. Demand for water in such multi-story buildings can vary significantly throughout the day, and this unpredictable flow places extraordinary demands on pumping equipment. The original vertical triplex booster pump system (20HP and two 30HP) at the Martin Selig Real Estate headquarters building at 1000 2nd Ave. was 27 years old and lacked reliability and not equipped with modern energy efficient options. Boyd planned to repair the pumping station until Corey Rasmussen, sales manager at Grundfos, a global provider of pumps and pumping systems, suggested that the property management’s investment would be better spent on a new, more efficient water boosting system. To support this recommendation, Rasmussen advocated an independent energy audit to determine the building’s actual pressure requirements, given the condition of the existing 27 year old pumps. “We had absolutely no doubt that we could significantly lower the operating costs of the existing unit by using intelligent, demand-based pump technology,” recalls Rasmussen, who nonetheless provided Boyd the $17,000 repair quote. “The problem, however, was convincing a price-conscious customer to invest in new technology instead of rebuilding the decades-old pressure boosting pumps and motor drives.” Ultimately, Rasmussen suggested to Boyd the Grundfos Hydro MPC BoosterpaQ, an integrated pressure boosting system that would deliver the exact pressure necessary to achieve optimal performance — without direct human intervention. Ideal for water supply systems, as well as municipal boosting, water transfer, and industrial applications, these integrated pumping systems utilize an advanced controller to adjust pump speed and stage additional pumps as necessary to meet specific pressure demand.  Phil Boyd, chief building engineer of Martin Selig Real Estate, pictured in front of the company’s downtown Seattle headquarters at 1000 2nd Ave. “Initially, Martin Selig was looking at the possibility of rebuilding the existing pump station. After looking into the costs, we realized it made better sense financially to upgrade to a more energy efficient system,” says Boyd. Energy AuditIn order to demonstrate the value of replacing rather than repairing the pressure boosting system, Rasmussen contacted Grundfos colleague Roger Weldon, C.E.M., LEED AP, Energy Optimization Engineer, to arrange a... ...Read More...


Confronted by a failing domestic water booster pump at one of the downtown commercial properties managed by Martin Selig Real Estate, chief engineer Phil Boyd began searching for options to repair the existing tri-plex boosting pump system. The booster station serves the 43-story commercial office building at 1000 2nd Ave., located blocks from the Puget Sound waterway. Such high-rise buildings—including hotels, multifamily, office and other institutional applications—require pressure boosting equipment to raise incoming municipal water pressure to serve upper floors. Demand for water in such multi-story buildings can vary significantly throughout the day, and this unpredictable flow places extraordinary demands on pumping equipment. The original vertical triplex booster pump system (20HP and two 30HP) at the Martin Selig Real Estate headquarters building at 1000 2nd Ave. was 27 years old and lacked reliability and not equipped with modern energy efficient options. Boyd planned to repair the pumping station until Corey Rasmussen, sales manager at Grundfos, a global provider of pumps and pumping systems, suggested that the property management’s investment would be better spent on a new, more efficient water boosting system. To support this recommendation, Rasmussen advocated an independent energy audit to determine the building’s actual pressure requirements, given the condition of the existing 27 year old pumps. “We had absolutely no doubt that we could significantly lower the operating costs of the existing unit by using intelligent, demand-based pump technology,” recalls Rasmussen, who nonetheless provided Boyd the $17,000 repair quote. “The problem, however, was convincing a price-conscious customer to invest in new technology instead of rebuilding the decades-old pressure boosting pumps and motor drives.” Ultimately, Rasmussen suggested to Boyd the Grundfos Hydro MPC BoosterpaQ, an integrated pressure boosting system that would deliver the exact pressure necessary to achieve optimal performance — without direct human intervention. Ideal for water supply systems, as well as municipal boosting, water transfer, and industrial applications, these integrated pumping systems utilize an advanced controller to adjust pump speed and stage additional pumps as necessary to meet specific pressure demand.  Phil Boyd, chief building engineer of Martin Selig Real Estate, pictured in front of the company’s downtown Seattle headquarters at 1000 2nd Ave. “Initially, Martin Selig was looking at the possibility of rebuilding the existing pump station. After looking into the costs, we realized it made better sense financially to upgrade to a more energy efficient system,” says Boyd. Energy AuditIn order to demonstrate the value of replacing rather than repairing the pressure boosting system, Rasmussen contacted Grundfos colleague Roger Weldon, C.E.M., LEED AP, Energy Optimization Engineer, to arrange a... ...Read More...

In Seattle, Martin Selig Real Estate Invests In Pressure Boosting System

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In Seattle, Martin Selig Real Estate Invests In Pressure Boosting System

In Seattle, Martin Selig Real Estate Invests In Pressure Boosting System

Confronted by a failing domestic water booster pump at one of the downtown commercial properties managed by Martin Selig Real Estate, chief engineer Phil Boyd began searching for options to repair the existing tri-plex boosting pump system. The booster station serves the 43-story commercial office building at 1000 2nd Ave., located blocks from the Puget Sound waterway. Such high-rise buildings—including hotels, multifamily, office and other institutional applications—require pressure boosting equipment to raise incoming municipal water pressure to serve upper floors. Demand for water in such multi-story buildings can vary significantly throughout the day, and this unpredictable flow places extraordinary demands on pumping equipment. The original vertical triplex booster pump system (20HP and two 30HP) at the Martin Selig Real Estate headquarters building at 1000 2nd Ave. was 27 years old and lacked reliability and not equipped with modern energy efficient options. Boyd planned to repair the pumping station until Corey Rasmussen, sales manager at Grundfos, a global provider of pumps and pumping systems, suggested that the property management’s investment would be better spent on a new, more efficient water boosting system. To support this recommendation, Rasmussen advocated an independent energy audit to determine the building’s actual pressure requirements, given the condition of the existing 27 year old pumps. “We had absolutely no doubt that we could significantly lower the operating costs of the existing unit by using intelligent, demand-based pump technology,” recalls Rasmussen, who nonetheless provided Boyd the $17,000 repair quote. “The problem, however, was convincing a price-conscious customer to invest in new technology instead of rebuilding the decades-old pressure boosting pumps and motor drives.” Ultimately, Rasmussen suggested to Boyd the Grundfos Hydro MPC BoosterpaQ, an integrated pressure boosting system that would deliver the exact pressure necessary to achieve optimal performance — without direct human intervention. Ideal for water supply systems, as well as municipal boosting, water transfer, and industrial applications, these integrated pumping systems utilize an advanced controller to adjust pump speed and stage additional pumps as necessary to meet specific pressure demand.  Phil Boyd, chief building engineer of Martin Selig Real Estate, pictured in front of the company’s downtown Seattle headquarters at 1000 2nd Ave. “Initially, Martin Selig was looking at the possibility of rebuilding the existing pump station. After looking into the costs, we realized it made better sense financially to upgrade to a more energy efficient system,” says Boyd. Energy AuditIn order to demonstrate the value of replacing rather than repairing the pressure boosting system, Rasmussen contacted Grundfos colleague Roger Weldon, C.E.M., LEED AP, Energy Optimization Engineer, to arrange a… …Read More…