Energy Archives

NEMA Supports Obama's Call for National Efficiency Standards

NEMA Supports Obama's Call for National Efficiency Standards

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) is supporting President Obama’s February 5, 2009 announcement on the importance of national energy efficiency standards for consumer and industrial equipment regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE). NEMA President and CEO Evan R. Gaddis says, “President Obama’s has signed a presidential memorandum requesting that DOE set new efficiency standards for common household appliances that will save consumers money, spur innovation, and conserve energy. We have been a strong advocate for a robust national efficiency standards program that sets federal efficiency standards and avoids a patchwork of unworkable state standards. NEMA looks forward to working with Secretary of Energy Steven Chu and his team as they improve the work of the DOE Codes and Standards program.” NEMA has been at the forefront of federal efficiency standards since 1988 when Congress adopted NEMA’s recommendations for fluorescent lamp ballasts. NEMA developed the first energy efficiency standards for electric motors and distribution transformers, and those NEMA standards serve as the basis for today’s federal standards for those products. NEMA advocated for significant new standards on general service light bulbs that were adopted in the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. Those lighting standards, which go into effect over a two-year period beginning January 1, 2012, represent a 30% increase in efficiency of light bulbs while providing consumers with a variety of technologies to choose from. Presently, NEMA is engaged with DOE and other stakeholders in finalizing new efficiency standards for general service fluorescent lamps (e.g., four-foot fluorescent lamps) and incandescent reflector lamps (e.g., flood and spot bulbs used in recessed lighting applications). Those new standards are to be issued by June 2009. NEMA also successfully advocated for standards for exit signs, compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), and traffic lights in the Energy Policy Act of 2005, as well as metal halide luminaires (lighting fixtures) in EISA 2007.


NEMA Supports Obama’s Call for National Efficiency Standards

NEMA Supports Obama’s Call for National Efficiency Standards

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) is supporting President Obama’s February 5, 2009 announcement on the importance of national energy efficiency standards for consumer and industrial equipment regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE). NEMA President and CEO Evan R. Gaddis says, “President Obama’s has signed a presidential memorandum requesting that DOE set new efficiency standards for common household appliances that will save consumers money, spur innovation, and conserve energy. We have been a strong advocate for a robust national efficiency standards program that sets federal efficiency standards and avoids a patchwork of unworkable state standards. NEMA looks forward to working with Secretary of Energy Steven Chu and his team as they improve the work of the DOE Codes and Standards program.” NEMA has been at the forefront of federal efficiency standards since 1988 when Congress adopted NEMA’s recommendations for fluorescent lamp ballasts. NEMA developed the first energy efficiency standards for electric motors and distribution transformers, and those NEMA standards serve as the basis for today’s federal standards for those products. NEMA advocated for significant new standards on general service light bulbs that were adopted in the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. Those lighting standards, which go into effect over a two-year period beginning January 1, 2012, represent a 30% increase in efficiency of light bulbs while providing consumers with a variety of technologies to choose from. Presently, NEMA is engaged with DOE and other stakeholders in finalizing new efficiency standards for general service fluorescent lamps (e.g., four-foot fluorescent lamps) and incandescent reflector lamps (e.g., flood and spot bulbs used in recessed lighting applications). Those new standards are to be issued by June 2009. NEMA also successfully advocated for standards for exit signs, compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), and traffic lights in the Energy Policy Act of 2005, as well as metal halide luminaires (lighting fixtures) in EISA 2007.



Nation’s Infrastructure: Barely Passing

Nation’s Infrastructure: Barely Passing

Decades of underfunding and inattention have jeopardized the ability of our nation’s infrastructure to support our economy and facilitate our way of life. On 1/28/09, the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) released its 2009 Report Card for America’s Infrastructure—assigning a cumulative grade of D to the nation’s infrastructure and noting a five year investment need of $2.2 trillion from all levels of government and the private sector. Since ASCE’s last assessment in 2005, there has been little change in the condition of the nation’s roads, bridges, drinking water systems, and other public works, and the cost of improvement has increased by more than half  a trillion dollars. “Crumbling infrastructure has a direct impact on our personal and economic health, and the nation’s infrastructure crisis is endangering our future prosperity,” said ASCE president D. Wayne Klotz, P.E., F.ASCE. “Our leaders are looking for solutions to the nation’s current economic crisis. Not only could investment in these critical foundations have a positive impact, but if done responsibly, it would also provide tangible benefits to the American people, such as reduced traffic congestion, improved air quality, clean and abundant water supplies, and protection against natural hazards.” As the nation’s infrastructure receives focused attention from the White House, Congress, and the public, ASCE’s 2009 Report Card for America’s Infrastructure provides an assessment of the condition and need for investment of 15 infrastructure categories, including, for the first time, levees. While there has been some improvement in energy since 2005, overall conditions have remained the same for bridges, dams, drinking water, hazardous waste, inland waterways, public parks and recreation, rail, schools, solid waste, and wastewater, and have worsened in aviation, roads, and transit. Security, a category that was added to the Report Card in 2005, and which received an incomplete grade, has been removed from the list of assessed categories and added into the methodology used to assess each individual category. Grades ranged from a high of C+ for solid waste to a low of D- for drinking water, inland waterways, levees, roads and wastewater. The Report Card also presents five key solutions for raising the nation’s infrastructure GPA. These include: Increasing federal leadership in infrastructure, Promoting sustainability and resilience, Developing federal, state, and regional infrastructure plans, Addressing lifecycle costs and ongoing maintenance, and Increasing and improving infrastructure investment from all stakeholders. “The nation’s infrastructure faces some very real problems, problems that pose an equally real threat to our way of life if they are not addressed appropriately,” said Andrew Herrmann, P.E., F.ASCE, Report… …Read More…