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The Chicago Athenaeum: Museum of Architecture and Design recently announced the Museum’s annual GOOD DESIGN™ Awards for 2006, which recognize industrial design firms and manufacturers in more than 25 countries. The Awards elevate the best and finest new design and design innovation for products and graphics designed and manufactured as of 2004 to the present. Numerous facility-related products were recognized by the Museum this year. Founded in 1950, the GOOD DESIGN Awards bestow international recognition upon designers and manufacturers for advancing new and innovative product concepts and for stretching the envelope beyond what is considered standard product and consumer design. The Awards for 2006 were given in the following categories: electronics; sports equipment; children’s products; furniture; office products; industrial equipment; medical equipment; fabric/textiles; automotive/transportation; urban furniture/architecture; tabletop; kitchen and bath; household appliances; household products; lighting; hardware/tools; personal products; and graphics and packaging. Over 250 products and graphic designs were selected by a distinguished jury of recognized architects, designers, and authorities in the design world for recent designs worthy of the Museum’s GOOD DESIGN Award, attesting to the design energy, vitality, and current innovation in global design today. The Jury for GOOD DESIGN based their decisions on aesthetic criteria stated in the original 1950 Program–criteria which measures innovation, form, materials, construction, concept, function, and utility. Product appearance and aesthetic appeal is also considered. The Museum allows and encourages winning designers and manufacturers to use the GOOD DESIGN logo through a special license, the design by the late Chicago industrial designer, Mort Goldsholl in 1950, on product packaging, marketing, and promotions. A sampling of the 2006 winners: ElectronicsPanasonic eXpress Portable Media Player (PMP) UserInterface, 2005Designers: Drew Bamford and Sam Hoang, Teague,Seattle, Washington, USA and Andy Johnson, PanasonicCorporation of North America, Bothell, Washington, USAManufacturer: Panasonic Corporation of North America,Bothell, Washington, USA Hewlett-Packard Data Center Communications Vision ofthe Future, 2005Designers: Sebastian Petry, Scott MacInnes, and DrewBamford, Teague, Seattle, Washington, USA and KeithKuehn and George Daniels, Hewlett-Packard Company,Vancouver, Washington,USA FurnitureAwait Product Line, 2006Designers: EOOS Design, GmbH, Vienna, AustriaManufacturer: Brayton International, High Point,North Carolina, USA VIVO™ Interiors Systems Furniture, 2005-2006Designers: Douglas Ball, Douglas Ball, Inc., Ste.Anne DeBellevue, Quebec, CanadaManufacturer: Herman Miller, Inc., Zeeland, Michigan,USA My Studio Environments™ Interiors Systems Furniture,2006Designers: Douglas Ball, Douglas Ball, Inc., Ste.Anne DeBellevue, Quebec, CanadaManufacturer: Herman Miller, Inc., Zeeland, Michigan,USA Celle Seating Group, 2004-2005Designers: Jerome Caruso, Jerome Caruso LLC., LakeForest, Illinois, USA and Herman Miller, Engineering,Herman Miller, Inc., Zeeland, Michigan, USAManufacturer: Herman Miller, Inc., Zeeland, Michigan,USA Shelton Mindel Wood Side Chair, 2006Designers: Peter Shelton and Lee Mindel, Shelton,Mindel & Associates, New York,... ...Read More...


The Chicago Athenaeum: Museum of Architecture and Design recently announced the Museum’s annual GOOD DESIGN™ Awards for 2006, which recognize industrial design firms and manufacturers in more than 25 countries. The Awards elevate the best and finest new design and design innovation for products and graphics designed and manufactured as of 2004 to the present. Numerous facility-related products were recognized by the Museum this year. Founded in 1950, the GOOD DESIGN Awards bestow international recognition upon designers and manufacturers for advancing new and innovative product concepts and for stretching the envelope beyond what is considered standard product and consumer design. The Awards for 2006 were given in the following categories: electronics; sports equipment; children’s products; furniture; office products; industrial equipment; medical equipment; fabric/textiles; automotive/transportation; urban furniture/architecture; tabletop; kitchen and bath; household appliances; household products; lighting; hardware/tools; personal products; and graphics and packaging. Over 250 products and graphic designs were selected by a distinguished jury of recognized architects, designers, and authorities in the design world for recent designs worthy of the Museum’s GOOD DESIGN Award, attesting to the design energy, vitality, and current innovation in global design today. The Jury for GOOD DESIGN based their decisions on aesthetic criteria stated in the original 1950 Program–criteria which measures innovation, form, materials, construction, concept, function, and utility. Product appearance and aesthetic appeal is also considered. The Museum allows and encourages winning designers and manufacturers to use the GOOD DESIGN logo through a special license, the design by the late Chicago industrial designer, Mort Goldsholl in 1950, on product packaging, marketing, and promotions. A sampling of the 2006 winners: ElectronicsPanasonic eXpress Portable Media Player (PMP) UserInterface, 2005Designers: Drew Bamford and Sam Hoang, Teague,Seattle, Washington, USA and Andy Johnson, PanasonicCorporation of North America, Bothell, Washington, USAManufacturer: Panasonic Corporation of North America,Bothell, Washington, USA Hewlett-Packard Data Center Communications Vision ofthe Future, 2005Designers: Sebastian Petry, Scott MacInnes, and DrewBamford, Teague, Seattle, Washington, USA and KeithKuehn and George Daniels, Hewlett-Packard Company,Vancouver, Washington,USA FurnitureAwait Product Line, 2006Designers: EOOS Design, GmbH, Vienna, AustriaManufacturer: Brayton International, High Point,North Carolina, USA VIVO™ Interiors Systems Furniture, 2005-2006Designers: Douglas Ball, Douglas Ball, Inc., Ste.Anne DeBellevue, Quebec, CanadaManufacturer: Herman Miller, Inc., Zeeland, Michigan,USA My Studio Environments™ Interiors Systems Furniture,2006Designers: Douglas Ball, Douglas Ball, Inc., Ste.Anne DeBellevue, Quebec, CanadaManufacturer: Herman Miller, Inc., Zeeland, Michigan,USA Celle Seating Group, 2004-2005Designers: Jerome Caruso, Jerome Caruso LLC., LakeForest, Illinois, USA and Herman Miller, Engineering,Herman Miller, Inc., Zeeland, Michigan, USAManufacturer: Herman Miller, Inc., Zeeland, Michigan,USA Shelton Mindel Wood Side Chair, 2006Designers: Peter Shelton and Lee Mindel, Shelton,Mindel & Associates, New York,... ...Read More...

Museum Bestows Design Awards

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Museum Bestows Design Awards

Museum Bestows Design Awards

The Chicago Athenaeum: Museum of Architecture and Design recently announced the Museum’s annual GOOD DESIGN™ Awards for 2006, which recognize industrial design firms and manufacturers in more than 25 countries. The Awards elevate the best and finest new design and design innovation for products and graphics designed and manufactured as of 2004 to the present. Numerous facility-related products were recognized by the Museum this year. Founded in 1950, the GOOD DESIGN Awards bestow international recognition upon designers and manufacturers for advancing new and innovative product concepts and for stretching the envelope beyond what is considered standard product and consumer design. The Awards for 2006 were given in the following categories: electronics; sports equipment; children’s products; furniture; office products; industrial equipment; medical equipment; fabric/textiles; automotive/transportation; urban furniture/architecture; tabletop; kitchen and bath; household appliances; household products; lighting; hardware/tools; personal products; and graphics and packaging. Over 250 products and graphic designs were selected by a distinguished jury of recognized architects, designers, and authorities in the design world for recent designs worthy of the Museum’s GOOD DESIGN Award, attesting to the design energy, vitality, and current innovation in global design today. The Jury for GOOD DESIGN based their decisions on aesthetic criteria stated in the original 1950 Program–criteria which measures innovation, form, materials, construction, concept, function, and utility. Product appearance and aesthetic appeal is also considered. The Museum allows and encourages winning designers and manufacturers to use the GOOD DESIGN logo through a special license, the design by the late Chicago industrial designer, Mort Goldsholl in 1950, on product packaging, marketing, and promotions. A sampling of the 2006 winners: ElectronicsPanasonic eXpress Portable Media Player (PMP) UserInterface, 2005Designers: Drew Bamford and Sam Hoang, Teague,Seattle, Washington, USA and Andy Johnson, PanasonicCorporation of North America, Bothell, Washington, USAManufacturer: Panasonic Corporation of North America,Bothell, Washington, USA Hewlett-Packard Data Center Communications Vision ofthe Future, 2005Designers: Sebastian Petry, Scott MacInnes, and DrewBamford, Teague, Seattle, Washington, USA and KeithKuehn and George Daniels, Hewlett-Packard Company,Vancouver, Washington,USA FurnitureAwait Product Line, 2006Designers: EOOS Design, GmbH, Vienna, AustriaManufacturer: Brayton International, High Point,North Carolina, USA VIVO™ Interiors Systems Furniture, 2005-2006Designers: Douglas Ball, Douglas Ball, Inc., Ste.Anne DeBellevue, Quebec, CanadaManufacturer: Herman Miller, Inc., Zeeland, Michigan,USA My Studio Environments™ Interiors Systems Furniture,2006Designers: Douglas Ball, Douglas Ball, Inc., Ste.Anne DeBellevue, Quebec, CanadaManufacturer: Herman Miller, Inc., Zeeland, Michigan,USA Celle Seating Group, 2004-2005Designers: Jerome Caruso, Jerome Caruso LLC., LakeForest, Illinois, USA and Herman Miller, Engineering,Herman Miller, Inc., Zeeland, Michigan, USAManufacturer: Herman Miller, Inc., Zeeland, Michigan,USA Shelton Mindel Wood Side Chair, 2006Designers: Peter Shelton and Lee Mindel, Shelton,Mindel & Associates, New York,… …Read More…


International Code Council Takes Action on ASHRAE Proposals

International Code Council Takes Action on ASHRAE Proposals

This past October, ASHRAE made several proposals to the International Code Council, which develops model codes that may be adopted by code jurisdictions in the United States or internationally. After a public review of the proposals, final hearings for the code change proposals take place May 21-22, 2007. If the proposals are accepted, they would be included in the 2007 code supplement. “It is the governmental use of building codes and the conversion of standards into codes that derive the greatest benefit from the ASHRAE standards’ development process,” Terry Townsend, ASHRAE president, said at a meeting with ICC leadership, encouraging adoption of the proposals. A proposal to include new ventilation rates from ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2004, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality, was approved for inclusion in the International Mechanical Code (IMC). The change would lower zone ventilation in many zones, particularly those with high-occupant density, and improve overall ventilation results in systems where zones with differing ventilation requirements are served by a common ventilation system. “For many high occupant-density zones (like classrooms and places of worship), these new rates reduce outdoor air intake requirements by 50% or more, compared to the IMC,” Dennis Stanke, chair of the Standard 62.1 committee, said. “HVAC systems for these buildings can be designed with fewer air conditioning tons and operated using less energy. Lower intake rates tend to reduce both first cost and operating cost.” Four proposals written by ASHRAE’s Code Development Committee for ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings, and ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 90.2-2004, Energy-Efficient Design of Low-Rise Residential Buildings, were approved for inclusion in the International Energy Conservation Code.• EC39: Lowers the solar heat gain coefficient requirements in residential buildings in Climate Zones 1 and 2 to 0.37 from 0.40. This requirement is consistent with Standard 90.2-2004. • EC84: Adds a U-factor table to the code, and add definitions for C-Factors, and F-Factors.• EC98: Adds a requirement for hot-gas-bypass to the code.• EC125: Revises exterior lighting control requirements. Also related to its energy standard, ASHRAE plans to submit a public comment on a proposal to provide R-Value, U-Factor requirements and removal of the Standard 90.1 envelope section as a compliance method. ASHRAE opposes approval of proposal EC82 because it removes a partial reference to Standard 90.1. “While ASHRAE thinks the UA trade-off may be desirable, the envelope requirements and appendices of the standard should continue to be an alternative compliance pathway because they are technically based within a consensus process,” Townsend said. Also approved was a proposal to… …Read More…


LEDs Light Up Paris For The Holidays

LEDs Light Up Paris For The Holidays

The Maison de l’Alsace at the Champs Élysée is lit up with holiday splendour. Energy-saving LED fairy lights from OSRAM with its thousands of twinkling lights transform the house into a huge Advent calender. Behind every window a sight or a personality from Alsace can be found.Photo: Olivier Mauffrey/OSRAM


November Architecture Billings Index Second Highest of the Year

November Architecture Billings Index Second Highest of the Year

After consecutive months of very modest growth, the Architecture Billings Index (ABI) saw a considerable jump in November to its second highest reading of the year. The commercial/industrial sector recorded its best mark of the decade. With an approximate nine to 12 month lag time between architecture billings and construction spending, the ABI is a leading economic indicator of construction activity and should translate into a high level of activity throughout 2007. The American Institute of Architects (AIA) reported the November ABI rating was 57.5 up sharply from 51.1 in October (any score above 50 indicates an increase in billings). “The nonresidential construction sector continues to see a high level of demand for design services,” said AIA Chief Economist Kermit Baker, PhD, Hon. AIA. “Even though there has been some deceleration in growth the previous two months, an uptick in billings of this size is noteworthy in portending sustained construction activity in the months ahead.” Key November ABI highlights:•Regional averages: West (60.7), Northeast (58.0), South (51.1), Midwest (49.5) •Sector index breakdown: commercial/industrial (62.9), institutional (54.6), mixed (50.6), residential (47.4) •Inquiries index: 62.1 Matthew A. Litfin, an equity research analyst with William Blair & Company, stated, “The spike in the ABI this month reflects reinvigorated design activity, now that national elections have concluded and future interest rate policy is clearer. The November ABI reading is near record levels last seen in fall 2005 and before that, in mid-1998. Looking ahead to 2007, we are predicting very strong growth in nonresidential construction activity and stabilization in residential construction activity.”


Public Comment Period On Automated People Movers

Public Comment Period On Automated People Movers

The Transportation and Development Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers (T&DI/ASCE) announced earlier this week it will conduct a public comment period on Part 4 of its Automated People Movers (APM) standard (ASCE 21). In order to expedite the approval and release process, as well as to facilitate ease of use, the standard has been divided into four parts. Part 4 includes: operational monitoring, emergency preparedness, verification requirements, security requirements, and application specific acceptance requirements. The standard establishes minimum requirements for the design, construction, operation and maintenance of APM systems, and is used in the safety certification process. The public comment period for Part 4 of the standard will be held from January 18, 2007 to March 4, 2007. Interested parties can participate in the public comment period by contacting Phillip Mariscal, ASCE standards administrator, at pmariscal@asce.org or by calling (703) 295-6338. For more information on the standard itself, or ASCE’s standards program, parties can contact Joan Buhrman at jbuhrman@asce.org or (703) 295-6406.Founded in 2002, the T&DI/ASCE acts as a global leader for safe, secure and sustainable integrated transportation and development. Founded in 1852, ASCE represents more than 140,000 civil engineers worldwide and is America’s oldest national engineering society.


Freedom Tower's First Steel Post Erected

Freedom Tower's First Steel Post Erected

Most construction projects are not charged with this much emotion. Today, the Freedom Tower’s first steel post was erected. Heidi J. Shrager of the Staten Island Advance reports: “After a 4,700-mile journey from Luxembourg by land and sea and a political ride that seemed at times endless, the first steel column of the perimeter of the Freedom Tower was bolted into place yesterday. Under a crisp, blue sky, workers used a 400-ton crane to hoist the 25-ton pillar 12 feet, just high enough to clear the steel bar that will fortify its concrete encasement.” Read the rest of this story here.


Freedom Tower’s First Steel Post Erected

Freedom Tower’s First Steel Post Erected

Most construction projects are not charged with this much emotion. Today, the Freedom Tower’s first steel post was erected. Heidi J. Shrager of the Staten Island Advance reports: “After a 4,700-mile journey from Luxembourg by land and sea and a political ride that seemed at times endless, the first steel column of the perimeter of the Freedom Tower was bolted into place yesterday. Under a crisp, blue sky, workers used a 400-ton crane to hoist the 25-ton pillar 12 feet, just high enough to clear the steel bar that will fortify its concrete encasement.” Read the rest of this story here.



Scientists say, “nano is here, but so are the risks”

Scientists say, “nano is here, but so are the risks”

“If we don’t understand and address the safety risks of nanotechnologies, people will probably not buy the products,” Dr. Andrew D. Maynard, chief science advisor for the DC-based Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies, said in his keynote address during the American Society of Safety Engineers‘ (ASSE) “Solutions in Safety Through Technology” symposium held in Scottsdale, AZ. Many corporations are holding up development of products using nanotechnologies because they don’t understand fully what the risks are,” Dr. Maynard told the crowd. “They are the smart ones as they know that once they do understand and properly address the safety, health and environmental risks they will be ahead of the curve.” Dr. Maynard’s talk focused on what is known about the risks of nanostructured material and steps needed to take to ensure the safety of the workforce. Nanotechnology has been described to mean the technology development at the atomic, molecular, or macromolecular range of approximately 1-100 nanometers to create and use structures, devices, and systems that have novel properties. One nanometer is one-millionth of a millimeter and a single human hair is around 80,000 nanometers in width. Experts note that nanotechnology research has focused on molecular manufacturing–the creation of tools, materials, and machines that may enable us “to snap together the fundamental building blocks of nature easily, inexpensively and in most of the ways permitted by the laws of physics.” Past efforts at molecular level manufacturing have been described as attempts to assemble LEGO pieces while wearing boxing gloves. Nanotechnology, scientists say, will enable us to take off the gloves and build extraordinary things. “A definition of nanotechnology that I would like to share with you today puts it quite simply,” Dr. Maynard said. “Richard Smalley said that nanotechnology is the art and science of building stuff that does stuff at the nanometer scale.” Cancer researchers are very excited about nanotechnology,” Dr. Maynard said. “Using nanotechnology, they have developed particles for treating cancer…there is a switch on this nanoparticle that can tell the particle to destroy a cancerous cell. They hope to have more research done in the near future.” Dr. Maynard said there are several products in the marketplace containing nanomaterials such as sunscreen, insoles, cosmetics and batteries. A list of some of these products can be found here. So, what are the risks? There are no definitive studies yet on whether nanomaterials can penetrate the skin and, if they were to penetrate the skin, what would the risks be? It is not yet known what… …Read More…


U.S. Department of Energy Adopts Standards For Appliance Efficiency

U.S. Department of Energy Adopts Standards For Appliance Efficiency

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), earlier this month, issued a final rule that adopted Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute (ARI) Standards as federal test procedures to evaluate the energy efficiency performance of a variety of commercial cooling and refrigeration products. “While manufacturers have voluntarily conformed to ARI Standards for years, the federal government’s adoption of these standards will lend even more strength to their value in the global marketplace,” said ARI’s vice president of public policy Karim Amrane. “Ultimately, the widespread adoption of ARI Standards will help achieve a higher degree of efficiency and compatibility, as well as help consumers make fair comparisons and informed buying decisions.” DOE adopted ARI 810-2003 for commercial ice makers, ARI 340/360-2004 for very large unitary cooling equipment (240,000 to