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SAFETY PROS SEEK SOLUTIONS TO GROWING PROBLEM OF FATAL WORKPLACE FALLS

SAFETY PROS SEEK SOLUTIONS TO GROWING PROBLEM OF FATAL WORKPLACE FALLS

Falling at work is the leading cause of fatal/catastrophic incidents, especially from ladders and roofs. Fatal on-the-job falls increased by 17% in 2004 countrywide. To address this issue, the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE) hosted the International Society for Fall Protection (ISFP) Fall Protection Symposium this past June 14-15 in Seattle, WA, in conjunction with ASSE’s annual conference. Both were held at the Washington State Convention and Trade Center. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics notes that the increase in workplace falls was led by a 39% increase in the number of workers who were fatally injured after a fall from a roof (from 128 fatalities in 2003 to 178 in 2004) and a 17% increase in the number of fatal falls from ladders (from 114 fatalities in 2003 to 133 in 2004) in the U.S. About 88% of the fatal falls from roofs involved construction workers, compared with 54% for fatal falls overall. Fall restraints, fall arrest anchors, design criteria, standards and training were the leading symposium topics. A recent National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) study concluded that more than twice as many workers were injured from non-use or misuse of personal protective equipment than from lack of access to such equipment. Attendees came from around the globe to attend the ASSE Professional Development Conference and Exposition (PDC) with more than half being safety directors, managers and engineers. Founded in 1911, the Des Plaines, IL-based ASSE is a professional safety society and is committed to protecting people, property, and the environment.


Second edition of the Industrial Waste Treatment Handbook released

Second edition of the Industrial Waste Treatment Handbook released

Woodard & Curran is pleased to announce that the second edition of the Industrial Waste Treatment Handbook has been recently released. Based on the first edition, which was written by Frank Woodard, co-founder of Woodard & Curran, the second edition incorporates years of experience in industrial waste treatment and knowledge of industries, making this second edition more comprehensive. The handbook continues to build on the character of the first edition, which was noted by a recent review in Water Environment & Technology magazine to be an “exemplary compendium of solutions and alternatives to treat solid, liquid, gaseous wastes from various industries… this book motivates readers to handle pollution control both prudently and creatively.” Designed as a practical, on-the-job engineering manual for working professionals, the text includes a series of quick-reference charts and tables dealing with waste characterization, waste audits, and the environmental audit as well as priority water pollutants designated bythe U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and a newly expanded chapter on laws and regulations with a focus on air pollution control. A reference for environmental managers, engineers, scientists, operators and regulators, the Industrial Waste Treatment Handbook is published by Butterworth-Heinemann, an imprint of Elsevier. Woodard & Curran is a consulting and operations firm integrating services in engineering, science, and operations.


News From Campus of the Future Conference in Honolulu

News From Campus of the Future Conference in Honolulu

Datatel(R), Inc., and SchoolDude.com, Inc. announced yesterday a partnership to provide Datatel clients with a cost-effective and efficient way to manage their institution’s work order, preventive maintenance, and inventory management processes. The online operations management tools allow colleges and universities to realize increased savings and operational efficiencies. The announcement was made at the Campus of the Future conference in Honolulu, Hawaii, which concludes today. This event is a joint conference of three associations that serve higher education: The Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers (APPA), the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO), and the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP). “Datatel selected SchoolDude because they offer solutions designed to help plant management staff maintain and protect an institution’s significant investment in capital assets,” said Jayne W. Edge, vice president of strategic planning and marketing for Datatel. “They have consistently allowed higher education institutions to realize significant cost savings and gains in productivity.” Datatel provides colleges and universities with higher education technology and services to improve efficiency in business processes by improving department workflows and productivity. Datatel Colleague(R), the company’s advanced enterprise resource planning software designed specifically for higher education, focuses on five key business areas: enrollment and student services, financial management, financial aid, human resources, and institutional advancement. “According to APPA research released at the Campus of the Future conference, excellent facilities have a linkage with student attraction and retention,” said Lee Prevost, president and founder of SchoolDude.com. “A best in class facility management solution from SchoolDude, coupled with Datatel Colleague, will help clients improve productivity, manage workflow more efficiently, proactively maintain quality facilities for learning, and maintain a competitive advantage in attracting and retaining students.” SchoolDude.com is dedicated exclusively to meeting the requirements of educational facilities and operations professionals with integrated solutions that extend facility life, improve service, reduce operating costs, and relieve capital budgets. SchoolDude’s web-native solutions help college and university officials properly plan, manage and maintain their facilities while maximizing their existing resources. Datatel has partnered with SchoolDude to provide the following management tools:* MaintenanceDirect(TM), which helps customers streamline the entire work order process from request to completion;* PMDirect(TM), which helps users create, assign, and manage recurring maintenance tasks;* InventoryDirect(TM), which allows users to streamline the process of ordering, issuing, and tracking inventory items; and* PlanningDirect(TM), which simplifies strategic planning for colleges and universities future capital infrastructure needs(C) 2006 Datatel, Inc. All rights reserved. Datatel and Colleague are registered trademarks of Datatel, Inc. All other names, products and services mentioned are the property… …Read More…


New “Green” Fraud Advisory

New “Green” Fraud Advisory

The EcoLogo ProgramM, formerly known as the Environmental Choice ProgramM, has instituted a new “Fraud Advisory” service to help purchasers—government, business, as well as consumers—make sure the products they select are indeed Green. The advisory, which has been added to the organization’s Web site, www.ecologo.org, will list manufacturers and products falsely claiming product certification and bearing the organization’s EcoLogo label. The EcoLogo is one of North America’s most widely recognized environmental certification labels. “This is an important step not only to protect consumers and the EcoLogo but to protect the Green movement,” says Scott McDougall, President and CEO of the EcoLogo Program. “Certification helped spur the evolution to Green products because buyers learned to trust the designation and know it means products have passed rigorous tests and evaluations in order to be certified.” Preventing a Repeat of History“When the Green movement first started about 35 years ago, some manufacturers ‘self-declared’ their products to be Green with little or no evidence to back it up,” says McDougall. “Many did so through genuine ignorance, while others did it to take advantage of a hot new trend.” The result was a lot of confusion for consumers. And when some products were later found not to be environmentally preferable, buyers lost trust in the Green movement—one reason McDougall believes it was essentially dormant for many years. “It is important that we not repeat the mistakes of the past,” he says. “Virtually every industry from automobiles and industrial products to janitorial and office furniture is now seeking Green certification. For this to continue—and grow—consumers must know they can trust the EcoLogo label.” For a listing of ECP certified products click here.


Student Wins Engineering Scholarship

Student Wins Engineering Scholarship

At a private ceremony on May 21, local heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration (HVACR) contractor Engineering Excellence awarded Diamond Oaks Career Development Center senior Matt Metzner with the John Burgoyne scholarship. “The John Burgoyne Scholarship was designed to honor the memory of one of our finest technicians and also to bring to light the dire need for new young people in the profession,” said Tom J. Winstel, Engineering Excellence President and COO. “We hope that schools throughout the area will take notice of this effort and make the need known to their highly motivated students.” The scholarship is named after former Senior Technician John Burgoyne. Engineering Excellence created the scholarship opportunity to give back to their profession and raise awareness for the many opportunities available in the HVAC profession. EEI hopes that the new scholarship program will address specific concerns about the major shortage of qualified, entry level people in the HVAC field. The scholarship committee chose Metzner after searching colleges, training facilities, high schools, and trade organizations for a candidate that embodied the legacy of hard work and dedication that former senior technician John Burgoyne had left behind. The $5000 scholarship will be paid in two $2500 annual installments in time to begin and or continue the specified program. Engineering Excellence, Inc. operates both nationally and regionally from its headquarters in Cincinnati, OH serving customers across the US and Canada. Engineering Excellence, Inc. provides HVAC – Heating and Air Conditioning preventive maintenance, emergency service, design/build retrofits and engineering consulting to multiple-location retailers, industrial facilities, schools, non-profits, and owner-occupied buildings. For more information about Engineering Excellence, Inc., Inc., contact Tom J. Winstel, President and COO, at (513) 761-6000.


SimplexGrinnell Executive Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

SimplexGrinnell Executive Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

R. Bruce Fraser, director of industry relations at SimplexGrinnell (a business unit of Tyco Fire & Security), was recently awarded the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award from the Automatic Fire Alarm Association (AFAA) in recognition of exemplary service and leadership in the fire and life safety industry. Fraser (in photo, on right, with Robert Boyer, Chairman of the Board of Directors of the AFAA, on left) was honored in Orlando, FL at a joint breakfast of the AFAA and the Society of Fire Protection Engineers (SFPE). In presenting the award, AFAA president Tom Hammerberg said of Fraser: “Once in a while, an individual comes along who stands above the crowd. Your dedication and lifetime contributions are an inspiration to all of us committed to improving fire safety in America.” The AFAA’s mission is to be the foremost industry advocate organization dedicated to improving the quality, reliability, and value of fire and life safety systems. The plaque given to Fraser describes the qualities and contributions that led to his selection by AFAA for the Larry Neibauer Lifetime Achievement Award:* Impassioned and articulate advocacy for recognition of the positive impact automatic fire detection and fire alarm systems have on fire safety in buildings* Service on numerous technical committees, boards and councils* Promotion of and participation in industry research and education on all levels* Being a friend and mentor to many people throughout the fire protection community In his acceptance remarks, Fraser thanked the 200 attendees at the breakfast and all the people with whom he has worked over the years. Reflecting on the award, Fraser said: “Our industry and what we do is so important, and we really do make a difference. The professionals I work with on a daily basis are just incredible. There are so many individuals in our industry who are so deeply committed to and passionate about fire protection and life safety. I am both proud and honored to have had the opportunity to serve the industry alongside such dedicated people.” Dean Seavers, president of SimplexGrinnell, says he has the utmost respect for Fraser as a senior executive with the company, an advocate for the highest standards in fire protection, and an individual of great character and integrity. “Bruce is an icon in the fire and life safety industry. His contributions over five decades to SimplexGrinnell and the fire and life safety industry are simply immeasurable. We’re honored that he has chosen to spend his entire career with our company, and proud that AFAA selected him for this great… …Read More…


The Facility Manager’s Guide To Prevention of Avian Flu and Other Bird-Borne Diseases

The Facility Manager’s Guide To Prevention of Avian Flu and Other Bird-Borne Diseases

With a growing climate of fear over the avian flu and talk in the news of a potential pandemic, it is good idea to take a look at practical things facility managers can do to minimize the risk of bird-borne diseases. How do people get the avian flu? Avian influenza viruses circulate among birds worldwide. Certain birds, particularly water birds (e.g. wild ducks and Canadian geese), act as hosts for influenza viruses by carrying the virus in their intestines and shedding it. Infected birds shed the virus in their saliva, nasal secretions, and feces. Susceptible birds can become infected with avian influenza virus when they have contact with contaminated nasal, respiratory, or fecal material from infected birds. Most often, the wild birds that are host to the virus do not get sick, but they can spread influenza to other birds. Some highly pathogenic strains of avian influenza are very dangerous to poultry and other domestic birds, while other low pathogenic strains are not considered dangerous. Nearly all of the reported human cases of the avian flu have involved contact with infected birds: butchering or plucking chickens, eating undercooked poultry, or spending time in areas contaminated with the blood or droppings of birds. So far the risk of transmission from patients to other people has been low. But experts fear that this evolving virus will gain the ability to spread easily from person to person; for instance, by swapping genes with a human flu virus. In the investigation of the cases in Southeast Asia and the Middle East, humans who have been infected with the avian flu (H5N1) virus, have had substantial contact with blood, feces, or other secretions of infected birds. The virus can stay alive on handrails, etc. where birds have been, but only for several hours. In different environments though, such as in a cold pond, it can stay alive for days. Where the avian flu typically is ingested by mouth through feces-contaminated water, other bird-borne diseases are ingested by breathing airborne spores of bird feces. Entomologist research has found more than 60 transmittable diseases and dangerous parasitic organisms which can be fatal to some people and cause others to fall ill. When dried-out droppings are disturbed, a cloud of airborne dust carries microorganisms into the lungs, causing inhalation diseases such as histoplasmosis, which is the most common of the diseases accociated with pest birds. Eating or drinking foods that have come into contact with bird-related bacteria can cause ingestion diseases such as toxoplasmosis and query fever. Birds… …Read More…


The Facility Manager's Guide To Prevention of Avian Flu and Other Bird-Borne Diseases

The Facility Manager's Guide To Prevention of Avian Flu and Other Bird-Borne Diseases

With a growing climate of fear over the avian flu and talk in the news of a potential pandemic, it is good idea to take a look at practical things facility managers can do to minimize the risk of bird-borne diseases. How do people get the avian flu? Avian influenza viruses circulate among birds worldwide. Certain birds, particularly water birds (e.g. wild ducks and Canadian geese), act as hosts for influenza viruses by carrying the virus in their intestines and shedding it. Infected birds shed the virus in their saliva, nasal secretions, and feces. Susceptible birds can become infected with avian influenza virus when they have contact with contaminated nasal, respiratory, or fecal material from infected birds. Most often, the wild birds that are host to the virus do not get sick, but they can spread influenza to other birds. Some highly pathogenic strains of avian influenza are very dangerous to poultry and other domestic birds, while other low pathogenic strains are not considered dangerous. Nearly all of the reported human cases of the avian flu have involved contact with infected birds: butchering or plucking chickens, eating undercooked poultry, or spending time in areas contaminated with the blood or droppings of birds. So far the risk of transmission from patients to other people has been low. But experts fear that this evolving virus will gain the ability to spread easily from person to person; for instance, by swapping genes with a human flu virus. In the investigation of the cases in Southeast Asia and the Middle East, humans who have been infected with the avian flu (H5N1) virus, have had substantial contact with blood, feces, or other secretions of infected birds. The virus can stay alive on handrails, etc. where birds have been, but only for several hours. In different environments though, such as in a cold pond, it can stay alive for days. Where the avian flu typically is ingested by mouth through feces-contaminated water, other bird-borne diseases are ingested by breathing airborne spores of bird feces. Entomologist research has found more than 60 transmittable diseases and dangerous parasitic organisms which can be fatal to some people and cause others to fall ill. When dried-out droppings are disturbed, a cloud of airborne dust carries microorganisms into the lungs, causing inhalation diseases such as histoplasmosis, which is the most common of the diseases accociated with pest birds. Eating or drinking foods that have come into contact with bird-related bacteria can cause ingestion diseases such as toxoplasmosis and query fever. Birds… …Read More…