Facility Management Topics

Sarnafil Inc., a manufacturer of thermoplastic roofing and waterproofing systems, and Roofscapes, Inc., a full-service green roof firm, have announced a single source Sarnafil system warranty agreement for extensive green roof systems. Under the terms of the agreement, the companies agree to jointly promote green roofs and to offer a single source Sarnafil warranty. “We are pleased to be the industry’s first single–ply roofing manufacturer to offer a single source green roof warranty,” said Brian Whelan, president and CEO of Sarnafil Inc. “This agreement brings together two of the best companies in the green roofing market with a combined green roofing experience of more than 40 years.” Green roofs consist of a planted area on a roof surface. They offer numerous benefits to the building owner and the environment including, reduced building heating and cooling costs, protection of the waterproofing membrane, improved air quality, storm water retention, reduction in the urban heat island effect, and aesthetic appeal. “The Sarnafil-Roofscapes, Inc. agreement offers a breakthrough for the architect and building owner,” said Charlie Miller, president of Roofscapes, Inc. “Green roof systems require specialized design and installation expertise. It is imperative that the waterproofing system design and materials be of the highest quality to avoid costly and difficult repairs in the future. Likewise, the growing medium and vegetated cover design and maintenance are critical to the vitality of the roofing system. Now building owners can have the peace of mind of working with the industry’s most experienced green roof team and get a single source warranty covering the entire system.” The team of Sarnafil and Roofscapes, Inc. utilizes time tested design principles while customizing each installation to satisfy the demands of regional climates and conditions. Sarnafil and Roofscapes, Inc. encourage a design-build relationship with the owner and designer to address all issues involving the waterproofing design, plant selection, water management and conservation, maintenance requirements, and system weight in an effort to tailor the vegetated roof to climatic constraints and the client’s needs.


Sarnafil Inc., a manufacturer of thermoplastic roofing and waterproofing systems, and Roofscapes, Inc., a full-service green roof firm, have announced a single source Sarnafil system warranty agreement for extensive green roof systems. Under the terms of the agreement, the companies agree to jointly promote green roofs and to offer a single source Sarnafil warranty. “We are pleased to be the industry’s first single–ply roofing manufacturer to offer a single source green roof warranty,” said Brian Whelan, president and CEO of Sarnafil Inc. “This agreement brings together two of the best companies in the green roofing market with a combined green roofing experience of more than 40 years.” Green roofs consist of a planted area on a roof surface. They offer numerous benefits to the building owner and the environment including, reduced building heating and cooling costs, protection of the waterproofing membrane, improved air quality, storm water retention, reduction in the urban heat island effect, and aesthetic appeal. “The Sarnafil-Roofscapes, Inc. agreement offers a breakthrough for the architect and building owner,” said Charlie Miller, president of Roofscapes, Inc. “Green roof systems require specialized design and installation expertise. It is imperative that the waterproofing system design and materials be of the highest quality to avoid costly and difficult repairs in the future. Likewise, the growing medium and vegetated cover design and maintenance are critical to the vitality of the roofing system. Now building owners can have the peace of mind of working with the industry’s most experienced green roof team and get a single source warranty covering the entire system.” The team of Sarnafil and Roofscapes, Inc. utilizes time tested design principles while customizing each installation to satisfy the demands of regional climates and conditions. Sarnafil and Roofscapes, Inc. encourage a design-build relationship with the owner and designer to address all issues involving the waterproofing design, plant selection, water management and conservation, maintenance requirements, and system weight in an effort to tailor the vegetated roof to climatic constraints and the client’s needs.

Sarnafil Inc. and Roofscapes, Inc. Offer Single Source Green Roof Warranty

Topics Articles

Sarnafil Inc. and Roofscapes, Inc. Offer Single Source Green Roof Warranty

Sarnafil Inc. and Roofscapes, Inc. Offer Single Source Green Roof Warranty

Sarnafil Inc., a manufacturer of thermoplastic roofing and waterproofing systems, and Roofscapes, Inc., a full-service green roof firm, have announced a single source Sarnafil system warranty agreement for extensive green roof systems. Under the terms of the agreement, the companies agree to jointly promote green roofs and to offer a single source Sarnafil warranty. “We are pleased to be the industry’s first single–ply roofing manufacturer to offer a single source green roof warranty,” said Brian Whelan, president and CEO of Sarnafil Inc. “This agreement brings together two of the best companies in the green roofing market with a combined green roofing experience of more than 40 years.” Green roofs consist of a planted area on a roof surface. They offer numerous benefits to the building owner and the environment including, reduced building heating and cooling costs, protection of the waterproofing membrane, improved air quality, storm water retention, reduction in the urban heat island effect, and aesthetic appeal. “The Sarnafil-Roofscapes, Inc. agreement offers a breakthrough for the architect and building owner,” said Charlie Miller, president of Roofscapes, Inc. “Green roof systems require specialized design and installation expertise. It is imperative that the waterproofing system design and materials be of the highest quality to avoid costly and difficult repairs in the future. Likewise, the growing medium and vegetated cover design and maintenance are critical to the vitality of the roofing system. Now building owners can have the peace of mind of working with the industry’s most experienced green roof team and get a single source warranty covering the entire system.” The team of Sarnafil and Roofscapes, Inc. utilizes time tested design principles while customizing each installation to satisfy the demands of regional climates and conditions. Sarnafil and Roofscapes, Inc. encourage a design-build relationship with the owner and designer to address all issues involving the waterproofing design, plant selection, water management and conservation, maintenance requirements, and system weight in an effort to tailor the vegetated roof to climatic constraints and the client’s needs.


Friday Funny: A new office game!

Friday Funny: A new office game!

This week’s Friday Funny is just plain silly. It comes from the Web site, CorporateDump.com. The idea is to score the most points. Your attempts need to be verified by another co-worker. See how many points you can score in one eight hour shift. One point gags:Run one lap around the office at top speed.Ignore the first five people who say “Good Morning” to you.Phone someone in the office you barely know, leave your name and say “Just called to say I can’t talk right now. Bye.”To signal the end of a conversation, clamp your hands over your ears and grimace.Leave your zipper open for one hour. If anyone points it out, say “Sorry, I really prefer it this way.”In the middle of a meeting, suddenly shout out “Yahtzee!”Walk sideways to the photocopier.While riding the elevator, gasp dramatically every time the doors open. Three point gags:Say to your boss, “I like your style” and shoot him/her with double-barreled fingers.Babble incoherently at a fellow employee then ask “Did you get all that? I don’t want to have to repeat it.”Page yourself over the intercom (do not disguise your voice).Kneel in front of the water cooler and drink directly from the nozzle (there must be a ‘non-player’ within sight).Shout random numbers while someone is counting. Five point gags:At the end of a meeting suggest that for once, it would be nice to conclude with the singing of the national anthem (2 extra points f you actually break into song) (5 extra points if you start singing another nation’s anthem).Walk into a very busy person’s office and while they watch you with growing irritation, turn the light switch off and on 10 times.For an hour, refer to everyone you speak to as ‘Bob’.After every sentence, say ‘mon’ in a really bad Jamaican accent. As in “The report is on your desk, mon.” Keep this up for an hour.While an office mate is out, move his or her chair into the elevator.In a meeting or crowded situation, slap your forehead repeatedly and mutter “Shut up, damn it, all of you just shut up!”At lunch time get down on your knees and announce “As God is my witness, I’ll never go hungry again!” In a colleague’s diary, write in 10:00 am.: “See how I look in tights.”Carry your keyboard over to a colleague and ask “You wanna trade?”Repeat the following conversation 10 times to the same person: “Do you hear that?” “What?” “Never mind, it’s gone now.”Come into work wearing army fatigues and when asked… …Read More…


Steven Holl Architects announces the opening of the University of Iowa School of Art & Art History Building

Steven Holl Architects announces the opening of the University of Iowa School of Art & Art History Building

A hybrid instrument for the practice and analysis of art Steven Holl Architects announces the opening of the University of Iowa’s School of Art & Art History on September 8th. The building gives form to the innovative interdisciplinary educational model of the school by integrating dynamic spaces within implied volumes and indeterminate boundaries. The new building is a hybrid instrument for the practice and analysis of art based on the idea of ‘open edges and center.’ The University of Iowa has a long history of commissioning inspirational architecture and pioneering art education. The first university to grant credit for creative work in the arts, it gained renown in the 1930s for radically combining its art and art history programs into one school. Seeking to enhance its art program, it awarded the commission for a new building to Steven Holl Architects because of the firm’s particularly sensitive understanding of both the mission and programmatic needs of the art school. Partially straddling a pond and an adjacent limestone bluff, the building’s assemblage of glass and Cor-ten steel planes is woven into the site, creating new campus spaces, pathways and connections to the landscape. Necessitated by the constraints of the site, an elevated wing containing the library program extends out over the pond, with reading spaces engaging the vertical landscape of the bluff to one side and the existing art building to the other. The building is already functioning as a social generator for the University before its official opening. An outdoor terrace around the pond has become a popular gathering area for students, faculty, and people from the surrounding community. Campus traffic is drawn into the building at multiple points. Within the building, “formless” spaces work as a condenser of people, practice, and theory. The 70,000 sq. ft. building houses an auditorium, classrooms, an art library, studios, an art gallery, faculty offices, meeting rooms, and a café. A public route follows the contour edge of the pond and extends vertically up into the building’s central atrium by a suspended stair of red folded steel plates.Main horizontal passageways and meeting areas provide communal spaces essential to the interdisciplinary approach of the School. Glass walls line the building’s interior passages, revealing works-in-progress within studio classrooms and giving views throughout. Roof planes of concrete planks are folded up to diffuse an even north light throughout the art studios giving new expression to the prototypical artist studio skylights. In warm weather studios open up to exterior balconies. Natural finishes and exposed materials such as concrete floors… …Read More…


Steven Holl Architects announces the opening of the University of Iowa School of Art & Art History Building

Steven Holl Architects announces the opening of the University of Iowa School of Art & Art History Building

A hybrid instrument for the practice and analysis of art Steven Holl Architects announces the opening of the University of Iowa’s School of Art & Art History on September 8th. The building gives form to the innovative interdisciplinary educational model of the school by integrating dynamic spaces within implied volumes and indeterminate boundaries. The new building is a hybrid instrument for the practice and analysis of art based on the idea of ‘open edges and center.’ The University of Iowa has a long history of commissioning inspirational architecture and pioneering art education. The first university to grant credit for creative work in the arts, it gained renown in the 1930s for radically combining its art and art history programs into one school. Seeking to enhance its art program, it awarded the commission for a new building to Steven Holl Architects because of the firm’s particularly sensitive understanding of both the mission and programmatic needs of the art school. Partially straddling a pond and an adjacent limestone bluff, the building’s assemblage of glass and Cor-ten steel planes is woven into the site, creating new campus spaces, pathways and connections to the landscape. Necessitated by the constraints of the site, an elevated wing containing the library program extends out over the pond, with reading spaces engaging the vertical landscape of the bluff to one side and the existing art building to the other. The building is already functioning as a social generator for the University before its official opening. An outdoor terrace around the pond has become a popular gathering area for students, faculty, and people from the surrounding community. Campus traffic is drawn into the building at multiple points. Within the building, “formless” spaces work as a condenser of people, practice, and theory. The 70,000 sq. ft. building houses an auditorium, classrooms, an art library, studios, an art gallery, faculty offices, meeting rooms, and a café. A public route follows the contour edge of the pond and extends vertically up into the building’s central atrium by a suspended stair of red folded steel plates.Main horizontal passageways and meeting areas provide communal spaces essential to the interdisciplinary approach of the School. Glass walls line the building’s interior passages, revealing works-in-progress within studio classrooms and giving views throughout. Roof planes of concrete planks are folded up to diffuse an even north light throughout the art studios giving new expression to the prototypical artist studio skylights. In warm weather studios open up to exterior balconies. Natural finishes and exposed materials such as concrete floors… …Read More…


Follow up to yesterday's story on airport security measures: technologies to help identify liquid explosives

Follow up to yesterday's story on airport security measures: technologies to help identify liquid explosives

This follow up story on airport security measures examines the existing–but often not yet implemented–devices that can help identify liquid explosives. It comes from Celeste Biever of the New Scientist. Here are some highlights. “It’s not the case that we absolutely cannot identify liquid explosives,” says John Parmeter, an explosives expert at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. Joe Reiss of American Science and Engineering (AS&E) in Billerica, MA, which makes baggage-screening technology explains, “Analysts are trained to look for suspicious combinations of things. A solid explosive by its nature does not have a defined form and can take a variety of shapes and sizes. With liquids at least you know you are looking for a container.” AS&E’s Gemini device (not yet installed in most airports) can detect X-rays that are scattered by objects rather than those that are transmitted, allowing it to image even low-density organic materials such as the liquid explosives TATP and nitroglycerine. Rapiscan of Los Angeles, CA, which makes a large number of the X-ray machines used in airports, has added quadrupole resonance imaging to its X-ray devices. This technology, similar to magnetic resonance imaging, can identify specific molecules that might indicate the presence of explosives. Existing Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) machines look for certain nitrogen-containing compounds, including liquid explosives such as nitroglycerine and explosive slurries made of ammonium nitrate. The UK-based company Smiths Detection of Bushey, Hertfordshire, and Thermo Electron in Waltham, MA, have developed IMS machines capable of spotting TATP, although these are not yet in use. Devices to scan passengers for hidden explosives are also being developed. Scanners that measure the way objects absorb and reflect terahertz waves, which lie between microwaves and infrared on the electromagnetic spectrum, can detect explosives, as the reflected signal reveals characteristic spectral signatures. TeraView, based in Cambridge, UK, is developing small scanners that can be used to screen passengers for concealed devices as they pass by.


Schneider Electric Launches Expanded Automation Repair Services

Schneider Electric Launches Expanded Automation Repair Services

Schneider Electric recently launched expanded expert repair services for over 120,000 products from more than 2,500 manufacturers through its Telemecanique® Automation and Control Repair Services. As a result, customers now have a single source to repair or replace their entire automation and control equipment line, regardless of the manufacturer. “Our expanded ability to service virtually all makes and models of automation and control equipment creates a new level of service and convenience for the customer,” said Robb Dussault, marketing manager for Telemecanique Automation and Control Repair Services, Schneider Electric North America. “Customers no longer need to look to multiple vendors for different types of equipment repair. They’re now able to get the experience and fast turnaround that Schneider Electric is known for on all their equipment, regardless of the manufacturer.” The expanded service offering provides industrial end users with: * A single-source electronics repair service for all electronic repair needs* Service for products from multiple vendors of AC and DC drives, servo drives and motors, HMIs, automation equipment, PLCs, metering equipment and more* Quick turnaround time with standard repair completed in seven business days and standard exchanges completed in one business day* Warranty on complete repaired or exchanged products, not limited to just the repaired portion of the product* Access to an inventory of refurbished equipment from all major manufacturers For more information on Telemecanique Automation and Control Repair Services from Schneider Electric, or to order a 430-page catalog, visit www.us.telemecanique.com/repair or call 1‑800‑468‑5342. Headquartered in Palatine, Ill., the North American Operating Division of Schneider Electric had sales of $2.8 billion (U.S.) in 2005. The North American Operating Division is one of four operating divisions of Schneider Electric, headquartered in Paris, France, and markets the Square D, Telemecanique and Merlin Gerin brand products to customers in the United States, Canada and Mexico. In the United States, Schneider Electric is best known by its flagship Square D brand, with Telemecanique becoming increasingly known in the industrial control and automation markets and supported by many Square D distributors. For 100 years, Square D has been a market-leading brand of electrical distribution and industrial control products, systems and services. Schneider Electric is a global electrical industry leader with 2005 sales of approximately $14.5 billion (U.S.).


Study Finds That Construction/Contractor Industry Confidence Has Fallen Nearly 40%

Study Finds That Construction/Contractor Industry Confidence Has Fallen Nearly 40%

Cost of Materials Continues as Leading Issue. Energy & Fuel Leaps to Second Greatest Concern Construction and contractor industry confidence in the economy has dropped by nearly 40% in the past three months, according to the results of an International Profit Associates Small Business Research Board (IPA SBRB) survey released here today. The IPA SBRB Construction/Contractor Confidence Index fell to 30.7 for the most recent poll completed earlier this month, down from an index of 49.3 in May. By contrast, this outlook was far more pessimistic than that of all small businesses for which the IPA SBRB Small Business Confidence Index (SBCI) dropped about 20% to 39.3 from 47.3 during the same three-month period. According to the results of the newly issued survey, 26% said they had confidence in the general economy versus 48% in May. Concurrently, 38% of the respondents in the current poll indicated disappointment with the direction of the economy an increase of 11% from the 27% who expressed that opinion in May. Nevertheless, 52% of the construction and contracting firms responding to the survey said that they are estimating revenues for the year will be about the same as last year while 40% said they would be better than their 2005 performance. Of the respondents, 49% said they intend to maintain current workforce levels while 26% said they intend to increase hiring with 14% decreasing hiring and 9% of the construction and contracting firms unsure of their plans. “The precipitous drop in confidence among the construction and contracting trades mirrors the concern we have heard from developers and builders about the slowdown in housing purchases and softness in commitments for new commercial projects,” said Gregg Steinberg, President of International Profit Associates, a provider of management consulting and professional services to small and medium-size businesses in North America. ”This data is alarming, though, both in how quickly the confidence among owners and managers of construction and contracting firms has changed as well as the steepness of the decline,” Steinberg added. “The confidence of construction and contracting firms, which had greater confidence than the universe of all small businesses just three months ago, has dropped by twice as much.” The cost of materials, energy and fuel costs, and taxes are listed by the respondents as their three leading business issues. The cost of materials was described by 25% of the participants as the leading concern (the same as the previous period), 15% named energy and fuel as a leading issue — an increase from 3% of the respondents… …Read More…


Fire Protection Engineers Boost Building Safety Since 9/11

Fire Protection Engineers Boost Building Safety Since 9/11

Although better building methods and codes cannot stop determined terrorists, they can dramatically increase the number of lives saved in the event of an attack. The fifth anniversary of attacks on World Trade Center has marked the occasion to evaluate fire protection engineers’ contributions to building safety. One group of professionals in particular has worked hard to advance building occupant safety through better construction methods and codes: fire protection engineers. These professionals analyze buildings from the standpoint of how fires start and grow, and how they affect people and property. They work closely with architects, state and local building officials, and local fire departments to ensure safer high rise buildings. Since 9/11, fire protection engineers have increased their scrutiny of extreme events, seeking to improve the science & technology that is needed to make tall buildings safer. Last year, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), as part of the investigation into collapse of the World Trade Center, recommended including fire protection engineers in building design teams in order to prevent future devastation, especially on high rise buildings. “We have seen our work sought more frequently among the general building community,” says Dr. Jim Milke, fire protection engineering professor at the University of Maryland. NIST also recommended that engineers in other disciplines receive continuing education in fire protection engineering, so they too can know how buildings react under extreme conditions. Even before NIST released its report, the Bethesda, MD-based Society of Fire Protection Engineers (SFPE) had undertaken initiatives to advance similar goals. “We believe that we have a very important mission to serve our communities,” says Chris Jelenewicz, engineering program manager for SFPE. “Our knowledge base can be tapped to help limit damage and loss of lives in an extreme emergency.” SFPE recently collaborated with engineering departments at several colleges and universities to help develop courses that teach the principles of fire protection engineering to engineers of every discipline. The Society also developed distance learning programs to increase access to fire protection engineering education for students unable to travel or dedicate the time to attend full-time fire protection engineering courses. A fire protection engineer applies science and engineering principles to protect people, homes, workplaces, the economy, and the environment from the devastating effects of fires. Fire protection engineers analyze how buildings are used, how fires start and grow, and how fires affect people and property. They use the latest technologies to design systems to control fires, alert people to danger, and provide means for escape. Fire protection engineers also… …Read More…


Major Insurers Address Increasing Weather-Related Losses

Major Insurers Address Increasing Weather-Related Losses

Dozens of new insurance activities, such as “green” building credits and incentives for investing in renewable energy, are emerging to tackle the causes of climate change and rising weather related losses in the U.S. and globally, according to a major new report issued today by the Ceres investor coalition. Ceres is a national group of investors, environmental groups, and other public interest organizations working with companies to address sustainability challenges such as climate change. The report from Ceres also states that more insurance companies need to be offering similar services to minimize losses and make the most of business opportunities related to climate change. “Climate change poses unprecedented risks to the insurance industry, but it also creates vast opportunities for new products and services to help consumers and businesses reduce their losses, while also reducing the pollution causing global warming,” said Mindy S. Lubber, president of the coalition. “We’ve seen encouraging progress from big name insurers and brokers since last year’s devastating hurricanes, but many more creative services will be needed as we confront what is perhaps the biggest threat in the industry’s history. The report, “From Risk to Opportunity: How Insurers Can Proactively and Profitably Manage Climate Change,” highlights the insurance industry’s role historically in helping the country grapple and manage emerging risks. Ceres asserts that just as the industry showed its leadership to minimize risks from building fires and earthquakes, it is positioned today to further society’s understanding of global warming and advance forward thinking solutions to minimize its impacts. The report, written by two insurance industry experts, identifies 190 innovative products and services available or in the pipeline from dozens of insurance providers in 16 countries. Many provide win-win benefits, by reducing financial losses and greenhouse gas emissions. More than half of the activities come from U.S. companies, covering climate change solutions including energy efficiency, green building design, carbon emissions trading, and sustainable driving practices. Among the recent offerings that show promise for customers and insurers:* Firemen’s Fund Insurance is launching a first-of-its-kind “green” coverage, including rate credits and other incentives, for commercial building owners who rebuild damaged properties using green and LEED-certified (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) building practices. California-based Firemen’s Fund will begin seeking state regulatory approvals this month so that the products can be offered in states around the country this fall. * Marsh, the world’s largest insurance broker, and AIG, the world’s largest insurer, have launched carbon emissions credit guarantees and other new renewable energy related insurance products that are allowing more… …Read More…


Escalating air security frays nerves, heightens facility management concerns over design and security

Escalating air security frays nerves, heightens facility management concerns over design and security

Yet another flight with U.S. ties has been given “special treatment” today–this time it was a Northwest Airlines plane leaving from Amsterdam and landing in Mumbai. The flight was sent back to Schiphol airport with military escort, and several passengers were removed for questioning. With security levels elevated indefinitely, facility professionals are rethinking their efforts to design and build airports that can be both flexible and profitable under current–and future–conditions. On April 16, NPR’s Morning Edition featured a story that examined how some fms are coping while others struggle. Adam Davidson reports on how the design of an airport can make a huge difference in airport security. Here are some of the highlights: Despite the increased alert and the focus on liquids, Indianapolis’s airport was able to solve problems quickly, says John Kish, a manager there. “We ended up needing to buy a bunch of tables so people could repack without laying everything on the floor, and then we added a number of trash cans designed to hold liquids. Things worked remarkably well.” Kish says there is one big word these days in airport management–flexibility. Indianapolis airport is built in such a way that it is easy to layout some tables and trashcans and completely rearrange the security area. Not all airports are like that. For example, parts of Reagan National in Washington, DC have narrow, fixed entrance ways to the terminals, which means that security is almost always overcrowded because there’s not enough space to accommodate all of the post 9/11 equipment. Indianapolis airport started preparing for greater flexibility right after the World Trade Center was attacked. “It was October of 2001, right after 9/11,” says Kish. Architect Pat Askew is leading the design team for Indianapolis’s new terminal. He’s with the firm HOK, and he says since 9/11, airport design has one primary aim–to accommodate whatever security changes that might come up in the next few years and decades. “It really has to do with making sure that there are not permanent, immovable objects in your way, short of columns and roofs,” he says. Askew put the plumbing under the floor and not through walls, so that bathrooms could be moved quickly. He didn’t use any internal walls to bear the weight of the building, so that all corridors and walls could be quickly and easily moved around. If an airport is a big, empty space, it’s easy to respond to sudden rules changes, such as the one having to do with liquids on a plane. And in… …Read More…