Clearing up code confusion | Facility Executive - Creating Intelligent Buildings

Accessibility compliance may sound intimidating, but it doesn’t have to be. Knowing which codes and laws apply helps to avoid the headaches of costly retrofits or lawsuits. Now a new Web resource makes it easier to navigate the codes, standards and legislation that address accessibility. The International Code Council developed the site to help people […]


https://facilityexecutive.com/2005/11/clearing-up-code-confusion/
Accessibility compliance may sound intimidating, but it doesn’t have to be. Knowing which codes and laws apply helps to avoid the headaches of costly retrofits or lawsuits. Now a new Web resource makes it easier to navigate the codes, standards and legislation that address accessibility. The International Code Council developed the site to help people […]
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Clearing up code confusion

Clearing up code confusion | Facility Executive - Creating Intelligent Buildings

Accessibility compliance may sound intimidating, but it doesn’t have to be. Knowing which codes and laws apply helps to avoid the headaches of costly retrofits or lawsuits. Now a new Web resource makes it easier to navigate the codes, standards and legislation that address accessibility.

The International Code Council developed the site to help people understand how the different accessibility regulations fit together. The new site covers the International Building Code, ICC/ANSI A117.1 Standard, and different federal laws that address access for people with disabilities. The International Code Council, a non-profit codes and standards developer, works with the U.S. Access Board, the U.S. Department of Justice, and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to coordinate building codes and federal accessibility requirements.

Making buildings and housing accessible helps ensure the safety and equal opportunity of people with disabilities. It may also be required under certain state or federal laws. When owners make buildings and housing accessible to people with disabilities, it also can make good business sense.

Accessible buildings benefit businesses by expanding the list of qualified employees, widening the potential customer base and increasing sales. Most U.S. cities, counties, and states that adopt codes choose the International Codes developed by the International Code Council.

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