Guide to contractor cleaning | Facility Executive - Creating Intelligent Buildings

Cleaning tips, ideas, and suggestions should help BSCs work more efficiently and develop skills and procedures that help them protect the health of building occupants—the ultimate goal of cleaning.


https://facilityexecutive.com/2005/12/guide-to-contractor-cleaning/
Cleaning tips, ideas, and suggestions should help BSCs work more efficiently and develop skills and procedures that help them protect the health of building occupants—the ultimate goal of cleaning.
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Guide to contractor cleaning

Guide to contractor cleaning | Facility Executive - Creating Intelligent Buildings

The Building Service Contractors Association, International (BSCAI), the trade association for the building service industry, announces that Kaivac, Inc. is sponsoring the recently published A Building Service Contractor’s (BSC) Guide to Cleaning Restrooms. The document covers a variety of issues regarding rest room cleaning and specifically addresses the increasing need for more thorough, effective, as well as productive rest room cleaning systems.

For TFM‘s most recent coverage of this issue, see “Green Wants You” by Brian Kraemer.

Among the topics covered in the guide are:
• Current challenges in restroom cleaning
• Odor control
• Cleaning floors, drains, vents, and fans
• Chemical usage
• Removing and discouraging graffiti
• Worker training
• Bidding

“There are also several handy forms and charts that building service contractors (BSCs) can customize to fit their own specific needs,” says Carol Dean, executive vice president of BSCAI. “These, along with the book’s rest room cleaning tips, ideas, and suggestions should help BSCs work more efficiently and develop skills and procedures that help them protect the health of building occupants—the ultimate goal of cleaning.”

Rest rooms continue to be the “complaint” centers of most all facilities, says Ronald Goerne, a cleaning consultant, BSC trainer, and past president of BSCAI. “We still see survey after survey indicating that facility managers and building occupants complain that their rest rooms are not cleaned as well as they should be.”

Goerne believes that one reason for this is that though new products and chemicals to clean rest rooms have been developed and introduced over the years, in most cases, the same cleaning systems used for decades—sprayers, mops, buckets, cleaning clothes—are still being used today. “As The Guide to Cleaning Restrooms suggests, a new approach is necessary to address these concerns and improve overall rest room hygiene,” he adds.

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