Superdome remediation | Facility Executive - Creating Intelligent Buildings

Munters Moisture Control Services (MCS) played a role in recovery efforts at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans after the devastating Hurricane Katrina. Superdome officials turned to MCS to stabilize the 270,000-square-foot venue to prevent further water damage, remediate mold, dry flooded areas and remove damaged materials. For TFM‘s coverage of this story, see “Worst […]


https://facilityexecutive.com/2006/02/superdome-remediation/
Munters Moisture Control Services (MCS) played a role in recovery efforts at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans after the devastating Hurricane Katrina. Superdome officials turned to MCS to stabilize the 270,000-square-foot venue to prevent further water damage, remediate mold, dry flooded areas and remove damaged materials. For TFM‘s coverage of this story, see “Worst […]
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Superdome remediation

Superdome remediation | Facility Executive - Creating Intelligent Buildings

Munters Moisture Control Services (MCS) played a role in recovery efforts at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans after the devastating Hurricane Katrina. Superdome officials turned to MCS to stabilize the 270,000-square-foot venue to prevent further water damage, remediate mold, dry flooded areas and remove damaged materials.

For TFM‘s coverage of this story, see “Worst Case Scenario” from the archives.

The massive facility, home to the National Football League (NFL) New Orleans Saints and college football teams, was heavily damaged by high winds that breached parts of the building’s roof and suffered interior damage from the thousands of New Orleans residents who sought shelter there after the hurricane. Twenty-five MCS personnel and a temporary work force of nearly 250 laborers from the New Orleans/Louisiana area were used to complete the immense 45-day project.

“Our role was to stabilize the environment and to initiate the recovery process,” said Brad Key, Superdome project manager and national business development manager for MCS. “We were one of the first catastrophe companies to get the facility moving on the path toward recovery.

“Remediation of mold was a large portion of our job,” added Key. “Many areas of the facility remained wet for quite some time before we were granted access, and as a result, over one million square feet of drywall and ceiling was exposed to mold growth.”

MCS also was asked to ventilate the dome to meet a certain number of air exchanges per day. This task was substantial, because the structure encompasses 125 million cubic feet. To meet the requirement, MCS installed equipment capable of exchanging 160,000 cubic feet of air per minute.
Other project work included:
* Removing the playing turf
* Removing all carpet from the building
* Removing all bio hazard waste including meat in refrigerators, freezers and concessions and fecal matter from sewer system flooding
* Isolating and stabilizing 32 mechanical and electrical rooms in the building and maintaining proper ambient conditions in the rooms with use of desiccant dehumidification
* Removing contaminated HVAC filter banks and the filters themselves
* Evacuating 3.8 million gallons of water from the parking garage

“We are honored to have played a significant role in the recovery of this grand facility,” Key added.

The NFL recently announced that the Superdome will reopen for football in the fall. The New Orleans Saints will play the Atlanta Falcons on Sept. 24, the first event scheduled for the facility.

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