ASSP Sees Uncertainty In Workplace Fatality Report

Despite the reported decline in workplace fatalities, a worker still lost their life due to a work-related injury every two hours in 2020.

The American Society of Safety Professionals (ASSP) has expressed concerned about the uncertainty it perceives in newly released fatality data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The BLS reported that 4,764 fatal work injuries occurred in 2020, a 10.7 percent decrease from the previous year’s total of 5,333 and the fewest on-the-job deaths since 2013.

However, fatal occupational illnesses such as COVID-19 and work-related cancers are out of scope for this statistical report unless precipitated by an acute injury. Also, many people worked from home in 2020, meaning they were not exposed to hazards that may still exist at their workplaces upon their eventual return.

fatal work injuries
There were 4,764 fatal work injuries recorded in the U.S. in 2020, a 10.7-percent decrease from 5,333 in 2019, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The fatal work injury rate was 3.4 fatalities per 100,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) workers, down from 3.5 per 100,000 FTE in 2019. These data are from the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI).

“Reacting to the latest fatality data brings unique challenges because the numbers may not paint a clear picture of the reality of 2020,” said ASSP President Brad Giles, P.E., CSP, STS, FASSP, GIOSH. “Any reported decrease in worker deaths is encouraging, but this data does not reflect the devastating impact of COVID-19 on many worker populations.”

Despite the reported decline in workplace fatalities, a worker still lost their life due to a work-related injury every two hours in 2020. And the fatality rate for Hispanic and Latino workers showed a slight increase year to year.

“Most occupational incidents are preventable given today’s technologies and proven safety and health strategies,” Giles said. “Employers must be more proactive in adopting voluntary national consensus standards and implementing measures such as safety and health management systems to protect workers in all industries.”

Voluntary consensus standards promote best practices and prevent worker injuries, illnesses and fatalities. ASSP is the secretariat for many standards committees in the United States and worldwide, forming expert groups and ensuring standards are developed and revised in accordance with requirements from the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and International Organization for Standardization (ISO).

“Any reported decrease in worker deaths is encouraging, but this data does not reflect the devastating impact of COVID-19 on many worker populations.”

While regulatory entities like the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) set workplace safety standards mandated by law, voluntary consensus standards provide guidelines that safety-minded organizations choose to implement because of their merit. Consensus standards reflect diverse viewpoints and represent state-of-the-art practices and technologies while addressing gaps where no regulatory standard exists in today’s rapidly changing environment.

“Voluntary consensus standards can transform safety programs and help organizations more effectively identify and eliminate hazards that lead to worker injuries, illnesses and fatalities,” Giles said. “ASSP will continue to advocate for better protection of workers to ensure they return home safe to their families every day.”

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