Flexibility, Higher Pay Are “New Normal” For American Workplace

Organizations must cope with high turnover and increasing employee burnout, according to the third annual MindEdge, HRCI study.

Post-pandemic American workplaces are still returning to the “new normal,” according to a new collaborative survey from MindEdge Learning and the HR Certification Institute (HRCI). Part of this new normal workplace means that organizations must cope with higher-than-average turnover and high levels of employee burnout, according to HR and the Changing Workplace.

The online survey revealed that 67% of respondents indicated their workplaces are at least “mostly back to normal” – with those who work in Manufacturing (80%) and Education (76%) most likely to say that normalcy has returned.

American workplace
(Photo: Adobe Stock by insta_photos)

For most organizations, “normal” does not necessarily mean “the same,” the survey results indicated. Only 22% of respondents said that “almost everything is like it was before the pandemic,” while 33% reported that conditions at their organizations are fairly different or extremely different from the pre-pandemic norm.

For many organizations, this “new normal” entails a hybrid work schedule: 78% of respondents said their organization allows employees to work remotely at least part of the time. And a majority (52%) of these HR professionals indicated their organization is conducting HR functions remotely all or most of the time.

Respondents seem fairly happy with their post-pandemic work arrangements. Two-of-five (42%) shared that conditions at their organization are better than they were before the pandemic, while only 20% noted that conditions are worse. Another 38% said that conditions are basically the same as they were before the pandemic.

For many organizations, this “new normal” entails a hybrid work schedule: 78% of respondents said their organization allows employees to work remotely at least part of the time.

The perception that conditions are better than before is higher among those who work remotely at least some of the time (49%) than among those who do not work remotely (24%).

More Flexibility, Higher Pay

The combination of high turnover and employee burnout is forcing many organizations to institute new policies to adapt to the changing workplace. Foremost among these is the introduction of more flexible working arrangements: fully 66% of respondents said their organization has already introduced more flexibility to the workplace, and another 4% are planning to do so.

Other workplace changes include:

  • Benefits to help employees cope with stress: 51% of organizations have already introduced such benefits, and 11% plan to do so.
  • Higher pay: 49% of organizations have increased compensation in the wake of the pandemic, and 14% plan to do so.
  • Providing job-skills training as an employee benefit: 39% of organizations have already done so, and 11% plan to offer these benefits in the future.

Most organizations have not embraced the idea of training their employees in how to work remotely. Only 40% of respondents said their organization offers remote-work training, and only 24% provided such training to all employees. “With so many organizations adopting fully remote or hybrid work arrangements, training employees for remote work seems like simple common sense,” said Frank Connolly, director of communications and research for MindEdge Learning. “But the majority of organizations have yet to recognize the wisdom of this simple idea.”

 

Most organizations have
not embraced the idea of
training their employees in
how to work remotely.
Only 40% of respondents
said their organization
offers remote-work
training.

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